Archive of ‘China Hutch’ category

China Cabinet Makeover Part III

China Cabinet Makeover Part III

China Cabinet Makeover Part III

Custom built wine rack and panel doors

Today’s post will describe the custom built doors and our awesome surprise of the addition of a custom wine rack we decided to add to the middle section of our china cabinet makeover part III.

China Cabinet Makeover Part III

Our first thought was to add doors across the entire front of the china cabinet.  However, this just seemed off.  I knew it needed something else.  While enjoying a glass of wine with hubby, it hit me, wine rack!  That is the beauty of custom creation, they evolve in the moment and wine can be involved in the decision ;-).

China Cabinet Makeover Part III

Standing back and looking closer, it was going to happen, the center section of the china cabinet would be perfect for a twelve bottle custom built wine rack.  We decided to use a similar wine rack holder method we used on a prior project, but wanted to introduce a new building technique.  The end result was excellent and one we will use again.

China Cabinet Makeover Part III

In our previous wine rack construction technique we built for the charity project merely laid each wooden slate on top of each other.  This created a bit of a bulky look just right for that piece, but this one would need something a bit more tucked back as you see below – Isn’t she cute!  If you missed that post you can read it by clicking Here.

wine cabinet custom built for charity
custom built wine cabinet

For this DIY custom build wine rack design, we wanted to join the boards by cutting half the board width, so each board overlaid the other which provided a nice clean look. To start the project we needed some stock that was thick enough to blend with the overall weight of the china cabinet.  The custom built wine rack was created using 1” x 48” pine, available from The Home Depot.  After determining the length and width of the wine holder we cut to length the wine rack pieces. Which you see on the Craftsman table saw below.

China Cabinet Makeover Part III

As shown above, we laid the vertical four wine rack pieces (two for the front section and two for the back section) and marked a line where the horizontal pieces would cross.  This defined where we would rabbit cut, which we learned from Wood Magazine how to cut the pieces on our table saw.  We repeated this measuring process for the horizontal sections, making sure to define the exact location where the horizontal and vertical sections crossed.

China Cabinet Makeover Part III

Once the measuring was complete, it was time to cut the rabbits.  Since we don’t have a dado blade, we used two stop blocks that defined the right and left edges of the rabbit.  We raised the blade to the required height and cut the left edge.  We then made repeated cuts until all the stock was removed.

China Cabinet Makeover Part III

With the custom built wine rack pieces cut we did a dry fit before we nailed and glued the pieces together wtih our Ryobi Nail gun and Titebond glue. I love the look and it will bring anther update to an old china cabinet that will help make it a functional storage space.

China Cabinet Makeover Part III

After the wine holder was built, it was time to move to the panel doors.  Keeping in mind the overall size of the wine cabinet, we opted for a thick raised panel door using thin PureBond, trimmed with dado 1×2 and completed using ¼ round.

China Cabinet Makeover Part III

To get the exact door dimension we clamped two 1x2s to one edge of the cabinet and measured the remaining space and subtracted 1/8” (1/16” gap for each cabinet door side, which just happens to be the size of a dime).  We cut two ¾” Pure Bond panels using our measurements.  We then added the 1×2 trim to complete the look.  Finally, we cut ¼” round to provide a finished decorative look and attached with our Ryobi nail gun, filled in the cracks and nail holes with wood filler and Bondo combo to get ready to sand and prime with Valspar.

China Cabinet Makeover Part III

With the doors cut and trimmed, it was time to dry fit the panel doors into their space.  It took a bit of adjusting, but we were happy so far with the look and where this piece is going!

China Cabinet Makeover Part III

Now, we are to the tough part – the finish work to make it just the right piece for our home.  See you soon for the last part of our China Cabinet Make over series!

China Cabinet Makeover Part III

Hope you are as excited as we are to bring you this great old piece that became new again.

China Cabinet Makeover Part III

Until tomorrows Post – Have a great night!

Linda

 

 

 

China Cabinet Makeover

China Cabinet Makeover – Part II

Not sure if you recall, but back a while back we started a post about making an old china hutch new again.  Our prior post focused on the top section of the china cabinet makeover part I, the section that holds the china (which we still are doing finishing touches).  This post is all about the bottom storage section of the china cabinet makeover.

Top of China Hutch
Top of China Hutch

I found this little gem about 4 months ago on my very first thrift store shopping spree at Red Racks for a whole $40!  As you can tell from the before pictures, this china hutch was in desperate need of a redo, and who was better to give her a face lift then the Hello I Live Here team, right! 😉  This was no small undertaking, as we are still working on this baby because, well you know, a girl likes to change her mind as she goes along on a project, which left this QT a little unfinished and begging for me to get back to work now that we have some warm days.

China Cabinet Makeover - Bottom Base Before

Our first task was to rip apart (and I do mean rip) the hideous old and bulky trim molding and round crown that embellished this hidden beauty.  Believe it or not, this old trim was really built to last, real wood trim custom made and heavy duty!  Each trim piece was connected using sturdy dowels and needless to say, it took some muscle to remove the trim, but we made it happen ;-).  After the trim was removed, we also removed the three doors.  We made sure to save the hardware and the old trims just in case it came in handy with a future project, as we all say – don’t toss today what you may need tomorrow!

China Cabinet Makeover - Trim Added

Next up for our china cabinet makeover we added some modern and decorative trim that matched the top part of the cabinet (we really wanted more of that boxy look that was more cottage appearance on this piece).  The trim was purchased from The Home Depot.  We selected trim profiles that fit the design of our villa.  Each trim piece was cut on our Ryobi 10″ laser light miter saw at a 45 degree angle and nailed into place with our trusty Ryobi nail gun (which by the way our shop cannot live without either tool ;-))  We added new center railings for the new doors, and side moldings to each side as shown above and below.

China Cabinet Makeover - Bottom Base Before and After

After the trim was done, our china cabinet makeover was starting to take shape.  We used Bondo all-purpose putty to cover any nail holes, and joining trim pieces we added to the sides (that new square side boarder we just love spiffed up those sides like Cinderella going to a ball).  Once the Bondo dried, we sanded with our Ryobi Corner Cat Sander, and an 80 grit sand paper, followed by a 120 grit to give it the smooth appearance.

China Cabinet Base Trim Details

Once the sanding was completed, we primed the newly installed pieces, using a bare wood primer by Valspar in white.  Primer is important when you are using raw woods.  If you paint and the wood has not been sealed with primer, it tends to suck in the paint, taking up to 3 coats to cover, so always prime bare wood.  That was all I could complete today on this wonderful piece for tonight everyone, but I promise it will not take six more months to finish this series. 🙂

China Cabinet Base Trim detail

China Cabinet Base Trim Painted

Part III will show you our next elements we added to the new looks, and that wonderful little surprise that will introduce this old piece to the 21st century!  Hope you like the progress so far everyone!  Have a great night!

Linda

 

Old China Hutch Becomes New Again – Part 1

Annie Sloan Paint applied

Never leave an old piece behind – especially if it’s a China Cabinet!

Good afternoon Hello I Live Here readers.  Let’s talk old china hutches today.  Would you pass up a chance to transform an old china hutch?  The other day I was in a thrift store (Red Racks Thrift Store –  DAV Thrift Store) and came across an old china hutch.

Top of China Hutch
Top of China Hutch

 

Bottom of China Hutch
Bottom of China Hutch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As others were walking past her with a sour expression, Hello I Lived Here saw the potential and swooped in to purchase this little gem for $40 (that’s right both pieces).

Living in a smaller home, space is necessary, so for us at Hello I Live Here this older jewel was the right size and would allow us to display our unopened dishes still stored. Below is a picture of the 1970’s jewel Hello I Live Here found and started transforming.  Here’s how we updated the old china hutch.

We started by taking off the old trim.  Don’t worry, we will save this for our recycle pile for another project! :-).

Old Trim on floor
Old Trim on floor

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hubby was not so sure, but he humored me anyway and started the destruction.  The screws were hard to get to with our regular drill, so Curt removed the trim and piece needing to be cut with the Ryobi 18V Right Angle Drill which was terrific to fit in tight spaces.

P241_1_Final

Trim Removed
Trim Removed

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once the old trim was removed, we scribed a line and cut off the rounded edge you see at the top in the photo with a craftsman circular saw, giving the china hutch a new square appearance.

Cut Made with Craftsman Circular Saw
Cut Made with Craftsman Circular Saw

 

Old Trim on floor - Craftsman Saw
Old Trim on floor – Craftsman Saw

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once the cut was complete, we screwed the cut piece back to the china hutch top.  Now the square, craftsman style we love over here at Hello I Live Here, helped to shape rest of the design for the china hutch.

Cut Piece Returned to China Hutch
Cut Piece Returned to China Hutch

 

 

 

 

 

 

Using our Ryobi 18V ONE+ 18GA CORDLESS 2″ BRAD NAILER, we trimmed out the sides with 1×2 into a craftsman type feel purchased from our favorite store, The Home Depot.

Ryobi-Nailer
Ryobi-Nailer
Sides Trimmed with 1x2
Sides Trimmed with 1×2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once set, we added 1/4 round moldings American Wood Moulding WM108 1/2 in. x 1/2 in. x 96 in. Wood Pine Quarter Round Moulding to finish the look.

1/4 Round used at bottom
1/4 Round used at bottom

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Making sure the 1×2 did not stand over the bottom frame, I took the 1/4 round molding and turned it into the opening and nailed upside down. This provided a square edge for the 1×2 to sit without overhang.

Moving on to the top, we trimmed out the top using a 1 x 4 x 8 Select White Pine Board and Focal Point DWT3144-16 1-1/8 in. 3-1/2 in. x 192 in. Primed Polyurethane Window/Door trim.

Trimmed with Select Pine
Trimmed with Select Pine

 

Front 1x3 installed
Front 1×3 installed

 

 

 

 

 

 

To finish the look we added a small matching WM 984 3/8 in. x 1-3/8 in. Pine Mullion Moulding to the bottom of the 1×4 and then added the original trim piece back over top of the doors (I try to use the old pieces in a new way).  We love using the Ryobi brad nailer.  Its airstrike technology truly helps wood from splitting by to large of force.   Below is what it looks like trimmed out – Not bad for an old 1970’s piece!

Old trim piece above doors
Old trim piece above door
Trimmed piece
Trimmed piece

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After Hello I Live Here changed up the 1970’s China Cabinet, we primed the piece with a grey Rust-Oleum ultra cover latex primer.

primer
primer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Because the piece was older, a primer was necessary to provide a tight bond for the top coat, and provide a long lasting finish.  So what better choice than the trusted quality of Rust-Oleum 🙂

Primer on china cabinet
Primer on china cabinet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once dry, we applied a thin coat of Annie Sloan Chalk Paint in Old Ochre purchased from our friends at Wood Icing in the Chesterfield Mall.

Annie Sloan Paint applied
Annie Sloan Paint applied

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This unique decorative paint provided the piece the quality look we at Hello I Live Here are used to seeing.  We will be following the Old Ochre color up with a light coat of Annie Sloan brown wax once we complete Part II of our post.  This will give the china hutch a consistent antique look for this old piece that is new again.

woodicing Chalk Paint Annie Sloan
woodicing Chalk Paint Annie Sloan
Annie Sloan paint
Annie Sloan paint

 

 

sloan wax kit
sloan wax kit

 

 

 

 

 

 

It is our suggestion that you use the Annie Sloan brush with the paint and wax (purchased at Wood Icing).

sloan small brush
sloan small brush

I know they are pricey, but my last piece I used a regular bush, but noticed I used more paint, lesson learned!  This wonderful brush allowed me to buff the piece just right the first time, conserving both the paint and the wax.  Well, that’s part I of the China Hutch make over.  Hope you enjoyed the first half of Hello I Live Here’s China Hutch make over. Join at our site in a couple days for Part II and the full reveal of the China Hutch!

Happy start to October Y’all!

-Linda C