Posts Tagged ‘China Hutch’

DIY China Hutch Make-Over

DIY China Hutch Make-Over

DIY China Hutch Make-over

Old Town Paints Part IV Final

Good morning everyone!  I am sitting here at 6:00 with a large frosty diet coke finishing up the final post of our DIY China Hutch Make-over.  For those of you who missed the last three parts of the hutch story, I will put the links here for Part I-III in the post so you can catch up.

DIY China Hutch Make-Over

Completing this DIY China Hutch Make-over was a challenge.  I started out picking up this cute little, worn out hutch that needed a good updating; it had broken pieces, was full of 1970’s faux plastic pieces they passed off as wood trim and just looked yucky!

Bottom of China Hutch
Bottom of China Hutch
Top of China Hutch
Top of China Hutch

When we started the DIY China Hutch Make-over, I was initially just going to paint it and say ta-da!  But, for some reason, that was not sitting well with me.  I just could not get settle with the broken trim, and ugly faux wood, so I ripped it apart and gave it a good recycle that today’s generation could love.

photo (28)

In part I, we showed you how we cut off the old trim and re-styled the top of the China Hutch using our Ryobi Tools to provide a fresh look that fits today’s style. (See part I Here).

DIY China Hutch Make-Over

DIY China Hutch Make-Over

Cut Piece Returned to China Hutch
Cut Piece Returned to China Hutch
Front 1x3 installed
Front 1×3 installed

photo (39)

Part II showed you the bottom of the DIY China hutch Make-Over, which actually detaches from the top (Read Part II Here)

China Cabinet Makeover - Bottom Base Before and After

This was no small undertaking because, as you know from my posts, I reserve the right to change my design mind at any given time… and well that’s just what happened on the bottom.  (Click here to read part II).  Initially I was thinking to build three cabinet doors, including one to replace the center faux wood section that did not open.  I worked hard on trimming the bottom to match the new top trims and thought – wow I am almost done.  This was a snap! – WRONG – After building the two side doors, the middle door just didn’t work.  It was like a sore thumb, and I HATED it…pushing me to reach down into my design bag and draw up yet another design, leading to Part III and another trip to the Home Depot.

China Cabinet Makeover Part III

In Part III of the post, the final design was born as we showed you how we how I changed my mind from using three doors to two doors, and a custom built  wine rack for the center where the third door would have lived.  The DIY China Hutch Make-Over design turned out excellent and I love the way you can now hold 12 awesome bottles of wine.  (Click here to read Part III).

China Cabinet Makeover Part III

Now, after much ado, we bring you the final post of our DIY China Hutch Make-over.

DIY chalkboard Hello I Live Here

DIY China Hutch Make-Over

We put out a call to our readers to choose the paint color.  After calculating the vote we came up with a pale green and old white combination (we wanted a little contrast for the piece – so we choose two of the most popular voted colors by our readers on Facebook and Hometalk – thank you all for your help). The colors are stunning – Drool!

DIY China Hutch Make-Over

Looking to continue the theme for the DIY China Hutch Make-Over I set out to find a new paint color I stumbled on to Old Town Paints.

DIY China Hutch Make-Over

DIY China Hutch Make-Over

I was impressed with their 54 color selection, and how close I could get to your color choices.  I contacted Old Town Paints to ship my colors because there were no retailers close by St Louis Missouri that carry this wonderful paint.  (Hear that shops – distributors needed for great paint and your shop could be the great home of Old Town Paint – You’re welcome!)

DIY China Hutch Make-Over

Sasha, the owner of Old Town Paints was kind enough to ship us out Soft Moss, Cottage White, Antiquing Glaze, and a Clear Matted Finish.

DIY China Hutch Make-Over

Being a creature of habit, I was nervous to try something new, but did it anyway and was so glad I gave Old Town Paint a try.   This fab little company was started by Sasha Gareau (consignment store owner) and here fiancé Bobby Bouck (his family has been in the paint business for over 50 years!)  Starting her consignment store, Sasha used a competing paint for her painted furniture, but did not like the expense of the paint.  So what’s a girl to do?  Sasha created her own paint line – Old Town Paint.

DIY China Hutch Make-Over

Old Town Paint is a Chalk Paint Style Finish made here in the USA.  According to Sasha, she and Bobby sat down with a chemist, and after months of trial and error, the chemist helped them create a non-toxic paint, that had a chalk paint style finish, which launched Old Town paint in April of 2013, and the movement of their paint has been growing ever since – want to try it?  You can order by click here.

DIY China Hutch Make-Over

Being a research nut (from my old instructional design writing days), I took to the internet to find pieces painted with Old Town Paint.  I featured several of them on my Facebook to see your reaction – you loved them! Since all those I spoke to who used the paint also loved them, I took the plunge and used Old Town Paint on this project.  I have to say – it was easy to use.  The paint is very silky and adhered in one coat and accepted the matching finishes like it was butter on bread.

DIY China Hutch Make-Over

All things that spoke to me for this project because like Sasha and Bobby creating their paint took time, so did the re-building of this china hutch – so what better product to debut the piece to our readers than Old Town Paint, right?  Two master pieces that have come together – I can hear the two singing in harmony from here, can you? ;-).

DIY China Hutch Make-Over

I enjoyed this paint that comes in 54 lovely colors because it can also be used as a color wash, regular smooth paint, or can be applied thick to create texture (which will be great when I show you another product I discovered this week in a later post).

DIY China Hutch Make-Over

But one of the best bonuses… no need to prime or prepare prior to painting!  It was a dream come true – which makes me scream out – why don’t more paint shops in St Louis carry this jewel of a paint? Want to read more on this paint stop by their site at http://www.oldtownpaints.com  I was glad I tried this paint.  Very impressed and I will order it for a future project I blog.

DIY China Hutch Make-Over

Just look at the silky photos of the rebirth of this DIY China Hutch Make-over. Isn’t she stunning 🙂

Bead board back ground DIY China Hutch Make-Over DIY China Hutch Make-Over DIY China Hutch Make-Over Moldings added

I could not be more proud of the piece you all helped me build. So What do you think of the finished china hutch make-over that has been the longest, on-going project for Hello I Live Here in our history of an existing blog?

Bead board back ground

Sorry again it took so long, the nasty cold winter (Mother Nature – you know who you are) stopped us in our tracks this year.  I can tell you I have lived in St Louis for over 14 years and this is by far the WORST winter I have ever had (I threatened to move West every single day – hubby started to take me serous – a girl can dream about beach living again can’t she? 😉

DIY China Hutch Make-Over

Well, I just want to say thank you to all of you who follow our blog and to Old Town Paints and owner Sasha and Bobby for partnering with Hello I Live Here to get this project complete 🙂 .  I love writing and sharing my zany projects that are often shown on Bob Vila Nation, Ryobi Nation, and Hometalk  and other social media we use for Hello I Live Here.  Also, thank you for hanging in there with us as we fought the ugly weather to bring you our final post on our DIY China Hutch Make-over.

DIY China Hutch Make-Over

Happy Thursday and here’s to many warmer days for us all (just not to warm Missouri or I will have to look into that move west) 😉

–Linda

China Cabinet Makeover Part III

China Cabinet Makeover Part III

China Cabinet Makeover Part III

Custom built wine rack and panel doors

Today’s post will describe the custom built doors and our awesome surprise of the addition of a custom wine rack we decided to add to the middle section of our china cabinet makeover part III.

China Cabinet Makeover Part III

Our first thought was to add doors across the entire front of the china cabinet.  However, this just seemed off.  I knew it needed something else.  While enjoying a glass of wine with hubby, it hit me, wine rack!  That is the beauty of custom creation, they evolve in the moment and wine can be involved in the decision ;-).

China Cabinet Makeover Part III

Standing back and looking closer, it was going to happen, the center section of the china cabinet would be perfect for a twelve bottle custom built wine rack.  We decided to use a similar wine rack holder method we used on a prior project, but wanted to introduce a new building technique.  The end result was excellent and one we will use again.

China Cabinet Makeover Part III

In our previous wine rack construction technique we built for the charity project merely laid each wooden slate on top of each other.  This created a bit of a bulky look just right for that piece, but this one would need something a bit more tucked back as you see below – Isn’t she cute!  If you missed that post you can read it by clicking Here.

wine cabinet custom built for charity
custom built wine cabinet

For this DIY custom build wine rack design, we wanted to join the boards by cutting half the board width, so each board overlaid the other which provided a nice clean look. To start the project we needed some stock that was thick enough to blend with the overall weight of the china cabinet.  The custom built wine rack was created using 1” x 48” pine, available from The Home Depot.  After determining the length and width of the wine holder we cut to length the wine rack pieces. Which you see on the Craftsman table saw below.

China Cabinet Makeover Part III

As shown above, we laid the vertical four wine rack pieces (two for the front section and two for the back section) and marked a line where the horizontal pieces would cross.  This defined where we would rabbit cut, which we learned from Wood Magazine how to cut the pieces on our table saw.  We repeated this measuring process for the horizontal sections, making sure to define the exact location where the horizontal and vertical sections crossed.

China Cabinet Makeover Part III

Once the measuring was complete, it was time to cut the rabbits.  Since we don’t have a dado blade, we used two stop blocks that defined the right and left edges of the rabbit.  We raised the blade to the required height and cut the left edge.  We then made repeated cuts until all the stock was removed.

China Cabinet Makeover Part III

With the custom built wine rack pieces cut we did a dry fit before we nailed and glued the pieces together wtih our Ryobi Nail gun and Titebond glue. I love the look and it will bring anther update to an old china cabinet that will help make it a functional storage space.

China Cabinet Makeover Part III

After the wine holder was built, it was time to move to the panel doors.  Keeping in mind the overall size of the wine cabinet, we opted for a thick raised panel door using thin PureBond, trimmed with dado 1×2 and completed using ¼ round.

China Cabinet Makeover Part III

To get the exact door dimension we clamped two 1x2s to one edge of the cabinet and measured the remaining space and subtracted 1/8” (1/16” gap for each cabinet door side, which just happens to be the size of a dime).  We cut two ¾” Pure Bond panels using our measurements.  We then added the 1×2 trim to complete the look.  Finally, we cut ¼” round to provide a finished decorative look and attached with our Ryobi nail gun, filled in the cracks and nail holes with wood filler and Bondo combo to get ready to sand and prime with Valspar.

China Cabinet Makeover Part III

With the doors cut and trimmed, it was time to dry fit the panel doors into their space.  It took a bit of adjusting, but we were happy so far with the look and where this piece is going!

China Cabinet Makeover Part III

Now, we are to the tough part – the finish work to make it just the right piece for our home.  See you soon for the last part of our China Cabinet Make over series!

China Cabinet Makeover Part III

Hope you are as excited as we are to bring you this great old piece that became new again.

China Cabinet Makeover Part III

Until tomorrows Post – Have a great night!

Linda

 

 

 

Old China Hutch Becomes New Again – Part 1

Annie Sloan Paint applied

Never leave an old piece behind – especially if it’s a China Cabinet!

Good afternoon Hello I Live Here readers.  Let’s talk old china hutches today.  Would you pass up a chance to transform an old china hutch?  The other day I was in a thrift store (Red Racks Thrift Store –  DAV Thrift Store) and came across an old china hutch.

Top of China Hutch
Top of China Hutch

 

Bottom of China Hutch
Bottom of China Hutch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As others were walking past her with a sour expression, Hello I Lived Here saw the potential and swooped in to purchase this little gem for $40 (that’s right both pieces).

Living in a smaller home, space is necessary, so for us at Hello I Live Here this older jewel was the right size and would allow us to display our unopened dishes still stored. Below is a picture of the 1970’s jewel Hello I Live Here found and started transforming.  Here’s how we updated the old china hutch.

We started by taking off the old trim.  Don’t worry, we will save this for our recycle pile for another project! :-).

Old Trim on floor
Old Trim on floor

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hubby was not so sure, but he humored me anyway and started the destruction.  The screws were hard to get to with our regular drill, so Curt removed the trim and piece needing to be cut with the Ryobi 18V Right Angle Drill which was terrific to fit in tight spaces.

P241_1_Final

Trim Removed
Trim Removed

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once the old trim was removed, we scribed a line and cut off the rounded edge you see at the top in the photo with a craftsman circular saw, giving the china hutch a new square appearance.

Cut Made with Craftsman Circular Saw
Cut Made with Craftsman Circular Saw

 

Old Trim on floor - Craftsman Saw
Old Trim on floor – Craftsman Saw

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once the cut was complete, we screwed the cut piece back to the china hutch top.  Now the square, craftsman style we love over here at Hello I Live Here, helped to shape rest of the design for the china hutch.

Cut Piece Returned to China Hutch
Cut Piece Returned to China Hutch

 

 

 

 

 

 

Using our Ryobi 18V ONE+ 18GA CORDLESS 2″ BRAD NAILER, we trimmed out the sides with 1×2 into a craftsman type feel purchased from our favorite store, The Home Depot.

Ryobi-Nailer
Ryobi-Nailer
Sides Trimmed with 1x2
Sides Trimmed with 1×2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once set, we added 1/4 round moldings American Wood Moulding WM108 1/2 in. x 1/2 in. x 96 in. Wood Pine Quarter Round Moulding to finish the look.

1/4 Round used at bottom
1/4 Round used at bottom

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Making sure the 1×2 did not stand over the bottom frame, I took the 1/4 round molding and turned it into the opening and nailed upside down. This provided a square edge for the 1×2 to sit without overhang.

Moving on to the top, we trimmed out the top using a 1 x 4 x 8 Select White Pine Board and Focal Point DWT3144-16 1-1/8 in. 3-1/2 in. x 192 in. Primed Polyurethane Window/Door trim.

Trimmed with Select Pine
Trimmed with Select Pine

 

Front 1x3 installed
Front 1×3 installed

 

 

 

 

 

 

To finish the look we added a small matching WM 984 3/8 in. x 1-3/8 in. Pine Mullion Moulding to the bottom of the 1×4 and then added the original trim piece back over top of the doors (I try to use the old pieces in a new way).  We love using the Ryobi brad nailer.  Its airstrike technology truly helps wood from splitting by to large of force.   Below is what it looks like trimmed out – Not bad for an old 1970’s piece!

Old trim piece above doors
Old trim piece above door
Trimmed piece
Trimmed piece

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After Hello I Live Here changed up the 1970’s China Cabinet, we primed the piece with a grey Rust-Oleum ultra cover latex primer.

primer
primer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Because the piece was older, a primer was necessary to provide a tight bond for the top coat, and provide a long lasting finish.  So what better choice than the trusted quality of Rust-Oleum 🙂

Primer on china cabinet
Primer on china cabinet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once dry, we applied a thin coat of Annie Sloan Chalk Paint in Old Ochre purchased from our friends at Wood Icing in the Chesterfield Mall.

Annie Sloan Paint applied
Annie Sloan Paint applied

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This unique decorative paint provided the piece the quality look we at Hello I Live Here are used to seeing.  We will be following the Old Ochre color up with a light coat of Annie Sloan brown wax once we complete Part II of our post.  This will give the china hutch a consistent antique look for this old piece that is new again.

woodicing Chalk Paint Annie Sloan
woodicing Chalk Paint Annie Sloan
Annie Sloan paint
Annie Sloan paint

 

 

sloan wax kit
sloan wax kit

 

 

 

 

 

 

It is our suggestion that you use the Annie Sloan brush with the paint and wax (purchased at Wood Icing).

sloan small brush
sloan small brush

I know they are pricey, but my last piece I used a regular bush, but noticed I used more paint, lesson learned!  This wonderful brush allowed me to buff the piece just right the first time, conserving both the paint and the wax.  Well, that’s part I of the China Hutch make over.  Hope you enjoyed the first half of Hello I Live Here’s China Hutch make over. Join at our site in a couple days for Part II and the full reveal of the China Hutch!

Happy start to October Y’all!

-Linda C