Posts Tagged ‘DIY Projects’

How to Paint Kitchen Cabinets

How to paint kitchen cabinets - project complete

How to Paint Kitchen Cabinets

Just DIY It!

Hi HELLO family – well its ready –  How to paint your kitchen cabinets is happening right here tonight!  I wanted to take my time writing this post to capture all you need to know to do your DIY project.  So, how many of you did your homework?  Did you visit a paint shop and ask those questions?  Have you chosen your brand of paint?  Did you order the Cabinet Video from The Magic Brush?

Great job!  Now let’s get started on how to paint kitchen cabinets the Hello I Live Here way.

What you need:

Cordless drill or screwdriver
Krud Cutter or Trisodium phosphate (TSP)
Bucket
Rubber gloves
Protective goggles
Sponge
Putty knife
Spackling compound or wood filler
120- to 220-grit sandpaper
Tack cloth or rag
Deglosser
Painter’s tape
Drop cloth
Primer
Paintbrushes, 1.5-inch tapered and 2-inch-wide synthetic fiber brushes
Microfiber paint rollers, 2-3 inches wide
Paint
Paint tray and stir sticks

Instruction:

First, you really need to think about the paint you want to use.  We chose to use General Finishes Milk Paints to complete our project.

How to paint kitchen cabinets - General Finishes

We like this paint because it has a very good self-leveling agent.  This helps to level out the brush marks as the paint dries for a super smooth finish, which for us was the only choice since we were hand brushing everything. Because we are doing a cottage theme in the villa, we decided on Antique White for the tops, and Queenstown Gray for the bottoms.  We used 1 quart of each color (not bad right?)

Then, drop cloth cover all surfaces you do not want paint on, like your counters and floors, and use painters table around edges to keep paint off back-splash if you have one, and side walls.  We elected not to drop cloth the floors or the counter tops because, well, we are ripping both out.  Wood floors will be installed and new counter tops are on order along with back-splash systems.  But, you may not be doing those upgrades, so make sure you prep these areas before starting.

Next, remove those hinges and hardware.  (Note: I did not empty out my cabinets because I am a freak and clean mine every couple weeks to remove debris.) The best way to paint cabinets is to remove the doors and drawers. Don’t ever paint over the hardware – it’s an expensive mistake and keeps doors and drawers from closing correctly. Now, map out that kitchen! Map just how the doors and drawers go together in the kitchen by labeling each piece with its position.

How to Paint kitchen cabinets - label doors and frames

 

This helps you reassembly fast and easy. Use a cordless drill or screwdriver to remove hinges and hardware. If your cabinets have adjustable shelves, be sure to remove those — and the hardware that supports them — from the cabinets – ours set far enough back so we had no need to remove them as they do not touch the frames.

Once you are done mapping out the door return system, then you are going to scrub the cabinets like crazy!  Strap on the goggles, glove up and Get in there – remove all the junk and grease that all cabinets have on them. You can use TSP or Krud Cutter.  We used Krud Cutter an all-purpose, water-based, multi-task cleaner, degreaser, stain remover, and exterior wash. It removes even the toughest stains. Leaves no residue and requires no rinsing. It’s non-toxic, biodegradable, non-abrasive, and non-flammable.  Spray or wash on and let dry thoroughly before the next step.  You can purchase Krud Cutter at a paint supply store or your local Lowe’s or Home Depot.

How to paint kitchen cabinets -Krud Kutter

All clean and dry? Remember, if your cabinets are in great shape and free of nicks and dents, you can degloss with Krud Cutter and you not have to sand.  But if your cabinets are in bad shape and need work, now is the time to use a putty knife and the wood filler to fill any nicks or dents with spackling compound or wood filler; let dry. Sand the surface with 120- to 220-grit sandpaper to dull the surface and smooth down any imperfections. You can use a small sanding block from Home Depot to softly sand the areas and the frames and doors in all places. Use a tack cloth or damp rag to remove the dust after sanding.

Now that you are done, prepping, mapping, and cleaning the doors and frames, it’s time to do the prep work.  If you are using new hardware, make sure they are either the same size as what you are removing, or fill those holes with wood filler, and sand lightly to remove any hard surface – you want them smooth.

Prep work is important to the validly of the finished product.  Select a primer that’s recommended for the type of surface you have (wood, metal, or laminate) and have it tinted to the color of the top coat.

How to Paint kitchen cabinets  - primer the doors

 

This is especially important if the surface is dark or stained because the original finish can “bleed,” or be visible, through the top coat.

Again, this is where your paint stores like Reinke Decorating or Flanagan Paint & Supplies come in handy.

Consulting with the expert at your paint retailer can help you decide between a waterborne or solvent-borne primer.  We used Zinsser primer special for our type of cabinets (they were not the real wood we thought they were – so this worked great). We used a good Pro Purdy brush for primer, and worked it all in with the roller first, then stroked over with our Pro Purdy brush.  We let dry a couple hours as directed by the manufacture.

How to Paint kitchen cabinets  - primer the frames

Once we finished priming, and it dried – we moved on to adding our paint color.  We cracked open a quart of General Finishes Queenstown gray and applied the first coat to the face frames and the back of each door using the same method as when we primed the cabinets.

How to Paint kitchen cabinets - Bottom Cabinets Queenstown Grey

 

Rolled, then worked it all in by hand brushing – we did 2 coats letting dry 2 hours between each coat and following the manufactures directions.  Once both coats were completed and dried, we added the top coat to seal the product using General Finishes Professional Sealer with a satin finish.  Once dry we stood back in awe as we could not see one brush stroke!  AMAZING!!!

The second day we did the same process to the upper cabinets only we used the Antique White.  We again, primed, let dry, added 2 healthy coats of antique white, let dry 2 hours between each application, and then followed that with 3 coats of Professional Satin top coat by General Finishes.

How to paint kitchen cabinets - General Finishes Antique White

Once the paint finish has dried completely, it’s was time to attach drawer pulls, screw the hinges on the doors, and hang the doors on the frames, according to the map we made. We then slid the drawers back into place and stood back to enjoy the new cabinets we created.

How to Paint kitchen cabinets - Antique White top cabinets two coats

See not so bad right?  Well, do you think it’s easy?  Are you going to try to DIY it now that you see how to paint kitchen cabinets?  DIY can be rewarding if you take your time, and enjoy the process.  After saving a bucket load of money by DIYing our cabinets, we were able to afford the new counter tops and wood floors.  Yep both – you can see our wood floor story on the blog – as those are already in and took us about 4 weekends from start to finish.

Hope you learned How To Paint Kitchen Cabinets!  Please share a comment about your DIY kitchen cabinets experience!  Until our next blog post.

Paint your Kitchen cabinets-finished look

Linda 🙂

 

 

Disclaimer:  All information provided are the opinion and property of Hello I Live Here, LLC. and Hello I Live Here is not responsible for your outcomes. Sharing, copying and/or transcribing of this content in any way other than for your personal usage without written permission is prohibited. (c) Hello I Live Here, LLC. all rights reserved.

Painted Cottage Table

Painted Cottage Table with American Paint Company

Painted Cottage Table

American Paint Company

Hi everyone – tonight’s blog is all about my Painted Cottage Table American Paint Company paints.  This was a fun project with some great new paint we found over at American Paint Company.

Painted Cottage Table American Paint Company

Amrita Reitz was awesome to partner with Hello I Live Here to show their wonderful paint product.

Paint Cottage Table American Paint Company

Just look at how wonderful our Painted Cottage Table American Paint Company came out!  Isn’t it beautiful? 😉

Paint Cottage Table American Paint Company

As with any paints, we always test on a sample piece of wood to see how the paint works, as you can tell, American Paint Company’s Home Plate and Freedom Road went on easy and silky.

Paint Cottage Table American Paint CompanyWe used Home Plate paint on the wood plank top as shown below:

Paint Cottage Table American Paint Company

Then we tried Freedom Road on the metal base and followed it with top coat.  It worked wonders in both areas!

Painted Cottage Table American Paint Company

For those of you who are not familiar with American Paint Company, Amrita shared a few things about their paints with Hello I Live Here.  Amrita told us American Paint Company is a clay/chalk/mineral base paint, is all-natural, has zero VOC, is eco-friendly, and a solvent free paint.  Amrita shared their paints contain no acrylic, fungicides or co-polymers.  What does it all mean?  Only that this paint is an awesome eco-friendly paint, good for your furniture; as well as the person using it.  Look how awesome it works – the stencil looks amazing.

Painted Cottage Table American Paint Company

You can check out their products here.  American Paints has over 40 colors to choose from, great finishes and other products like brush prep, and Mica powders.  We sampled the Waxes and top coats and loved them, see the photo below.

Painted Cottage Table American Paint Company

Paint Cottage Table American Paint Company

American Paint Company offers online tutorials that ensure anyone can use their paints – check it out here and have awesome opportunities for retailers who may want to carry their products in their own shops – Are you interested?  Check out what they have to offer by clicking here.  You can see how well it worked on our Painted Cottage Table American Paint Company below.

Painted Cottage Table American Paint Company

We had a blast using this paint today – the colors were rich, covered well, and worked just like we thought after finishing our sample boards.  Want to try it?  Find a retailer near you or shop on line at these awesome retailers listed on american paint company’s page.

Have questions send American paint a note over at their website.  They are quick at responses and they pride themselves on their customer services. We had a question, sent to the site and bam answer in a quick few minutes.  You cannot beat customer service like that?

Painted Cottage Table American Paint Company

Keep watching as we try their paint on some other projects throughout the week.  After seeing this table, I am confident my other projects will look as awesome.

Painted Cottage Table American Paint Company

That’s our post of tonight – thanks for stopping by Hello I Live Here – Catch us on Facebook, HomeTalk, Bob Vila Nation, and Ryobi Nation Tools – as we blog some awesome projects this month.  And a big thank you to Amrita and American Paint Company for working with us as a partner.  Until next post… Stay happy everyone 🙂

Linda

DIY China Hutch Make-Over

DIY China Hutch Make-Over

DIY China Hutch Make-over

Old Town Paints Part IV Final

Good morning everyone!  I am sitting here at 6:00 with a large frosty diet coke finishing up the final post of our DIY China Hutch Make-over.  For those of you who missed the last three parts of the hutch story, I will put the links here for Part I-III in the post so you can catch up.

DIY China Hutch Make-Over

Completing this DIY China Hutch Make-over was a challenge.  I started out picking up this cute little, worn out hutch that needed a good updating; it had broken pieces, was full of 1970’s faux plastic pieces they passed off as wood trim and just looked yucky!

Bottom of China Hutch
Bottom of China Hutch
Top of China Hutch
Top of China Hutch

When we started the DIY China Hutch Make-over, I was initially just going to paint it and say ta-da!  But, for some reason, that was not sitting well with me.  I just could not get settle with the broken trim, and ugly faux wood, so I ripped it apart and gave it a good recycle that today’s generation could love.

photo (28)

In part I, we showed you how we cut off the old trim and re-styled the top of the China Hutch using our Ryobi Tools to provide a fresh look that fits today’s style. (See part I Here).

DIY China Hutch Make-Over

DIY China Hutch Make-Over

Cut Piece Returned to China Hutch
Cut Piece Returned to China Hutch
Front 1x3 installed
Front 1×3 installed

photo (39)

Part II showed you the bottom of the DIY China hutch Make-Over, which actually detaches from the top (Read Part II Here)

China Cabinet Makeover - Bottom Base Before and After

This was no small undertaking because, as you know from my posts, I reserve the right to change my design mind at any given time… and well that’s just what happened on the bottom.  (Click here to read part II).  Initially I was thinking to build three cabinet doors, including one to replace the center faux wood section that did not open.  I worked hard on trimming the bottom to match the new top trims and thought – wow I am almost done.  This was a snap! – WRONG – After building the two side doors, the middle door just didn’t work.  It was like a sore thumb, and I HATED it…pushing me to reach down into my design bag and draw up yet another design, leading to Part III and another trip to the Home Depot.

China Cabinet Makeover Part III

In Part III of the post, the final design was born as we showed you how we how I changed my mind from using three doors to two doors, and a custom built  wine rack for the center where the third door would have lived.  The DIY China Hutch Make-Over design turned out excellent and I love the way you can now hold 12 awesome bottles of wine.  (Click here to read Part III).

China Cabinet Makeover Part III

Now, after much ado, we bring you the final post of our DIY China Hutch Make-over.

DIY chalkboard Hello I Live Here

DIY China Hutch Make-Over

We put out a call to our readers to choose the paint color.  After calculating the vote we came up with a pale green and old white combination (we wanted a little contrast for the piece – so we choose two of the most popular voted colors by our readers on Facebook and Hometalk – thank you all for your help). The colors are stunning – Drool!

DIY China Hutch Make-Over

Looking to continue the theme for the DIY China Hutch Make-Over I set out to find a new paint color I stumbled on to Old Town Paints.

DIY China Hutch Make-Over

DIY China Hutch Make-Over

I was impressed with their 54 color selection, and how close I could get to your color choices.  I contacted Old Town Paints to ship my colors because there were no retailers close by St Louis Missouri that carry this wonderful paint.  (Hear that shops – distributors needed for great paint and your shop could be the great home of Old Town Paint – You’re welcome!)

DIY China Hutch Make-Over

Sasha, the owner of Old Town Paints was kind enough to ship us out Soft Moss, Cottage White, Antiquing Glaze, and a Clear Matted Finish.

DIY China Hutch Make-Over

Being a creature of habit, I was nervous to try something new, but did it anyway and was so glad I gave Old Town Paint a try.   This fab little company was started by Sasha Gareau (consignment store owner) and here fiancé Bobby Bouck (his family has been in the paint business for over 50 years!)  Starting her consignment store, Sasha used a competing paint for her painted furniture, but did not like the expense of the paint.  So what’s a girl to do?  Sasha created her own paint line – Old Town Paint.

DIY China Hutch Make-Over

Old Town Paint is a Chalk Paint Style Finish made here in the USA.  According to Sasha, she and Bobby sat down with a chemist, and after months of trial and error, the chemist helped them create a non-toxic paint, that had a chalk paint style finish, which launched Old Town paint in April of 2013, and the movement of their paint has been growing ever since – want to try it?  You can order by click here.

DIY China Hutch Make-Over

Being a research nut (from my old instructional design writing days), I took to the internet to find pieces painted with Old Town Paint.  I featured several of them on my Facebook to see your reaction – you loved them! Since all those I spoke to who used the paint also loved them, I took the plunge and used Old Town Paint on this project.  I have to say – it was easy to use.  The paint is very silky and adhered in one coat and accepted the matching finishes like it was butter on bread.

DIY China Hutch Make-Over

All things that spoke to me for this project because like Sasha and Bobby creating their paint took time, so did the re-building of this china hutch – so what better product to debut the piece to our readers than Old Town Paint, right?  Two master pieces that have come together – I can hear the two singing in harmony from here, can you? ;-).

DIY China Hutch Make-Over

I enjoyed this paint that comes in 54 lovely colors because it can also be used as a color wash, regular smooth paint, or can be applied thick to create texture (which will be great when I show you another product I discovered this week in a later post).

DIY China Hutch Make-Over

But one of the best bonuses… no need to prime or prepare prior to painting!  It was a dream come true – which makes me scream out – why don’t more paint shops in St Louis carry this jewel of a paint? Want to read more on this paint stop by their site at http://www.oldtownpaints.com  I was glad I tried this paint.  Very impressed and I will order it for a future project I blog.

DIY China Hutch Make-Over

Just look at the silky photos of the rebirth of this DIY China Hutch Make-over. Isn’t she stunning 🙂

Bead board back ground DIY China Hutch Make-Over DIY China Hutch Make-Over DIY China Hutch Make-Over Moldings added

I could not be more proud of the piece you all helped me build. So What do you think of the finished china hutch make-over that has been the longest, on-going project for Hello I Live Here in our history of an existing blog?

Bead board back ground

Sorry again it took so long, the nasty cold winter (Mother Nature – you know who you are) stopped us in our tracks this year.  I can tell you I have lived in St Louis for over 14 years and this is by far the WORST winter I have ever had (I threatened to move West every single day – hubby started to take me serous – a girl can dream about beach living again can’t she? 😉

DIY China Hutch Make-Over

Well, I just want to say thank you to all of you who follow our blog and to Old Town Paints and owner Sasha and Bobby for partnering with Hello I Live Here to get this project complete 🙂 .  I love writing and sharing my zany projects that are often shown on Bob Vila Nation, Ryobi Nation, and Hometalk  and other social media we use for Hello I Live Here.  Also, thank you for hanging in there with us as we fought the ugly weather to bring you our final post on our DIY China Hutch Make-over.

DIY China Hutch Make-Over

Happy Thursday and here’s to many warmer days for us all (just not to warm Missouri or I will have to look into that move west) 😉

–Linda

DIY Picture Frame

DIY Picture Frame by Hello I Live Here

DIY Picture Frame

Hi everyone!  Today we are going to show you how to make DIY picture frame from your old scrap wood.  This is a pretty easy project.  It cost us nothing to make since we had all the scraps in our garage wood storage box (our scraps always become a DIY something 😉 ).

DIY Picture Frame by Hello I Live Here

A DIY picture frame is fun, but even better with they can be made with left over craft or wood scraps you just can’t toss away.  We used all the left over scrap we had from framing our bathroom mirror post which was featured on Bob Vila Nation, wood left from a cabinet build, and tile left over from our tile project in the master bathroom.  You can pretty much use anything to make a good DIY picture frame, so don’t be afraid to be creative.

DIY Picture Frame by Hello I Live Here

Here’s what we did to create our DIY picture frame:

First, I cut the frame pieces to my desired length on 45 degree angels using my Ryboi Miter Saw to start my DIY Picture Frame.  Then we glued the 45 degree angels together and added a small brad nail using our Ryobi nail gun to form our DIY picture frame.

DIY Picture Frame by Hello I Live Here

Once done, we trimmed down a small piece of wood for the center of the DIY picture frame and installed by using our Kreg jig to make 4 Kreg pocket holes, our Ridge power driver, and 4 pan head screws as show in the 3rd photo above.  We secured the flat board to the sides of the frame.

Master bathroom Storage - tools we used

After we were done we painted the board the color of our choice, we used Annie Sloan Chalk paint in French Linen.

Annie Sloan paint
Annie Sloan paint
sloan wax kit
sloan wax kit

Once we painted the board we added our left over tile around the edge of the frame.  The pieces left over were perfect and we slid them into place like a puzzle making sure we did not have to cut any of the tile. We then added grout from The Home Depot.

DIY picture frame

On the side of the DIY picture frame, we used wood icing product and a stencil to get our raised decor on the frame.  We simple spread the wood icing product on like peanut butter, and let it sit a couple minutes, then lifted the stencil to get our effect.

DIY Picture Frame by Hello I Live Here

When the stencil dried, we painted the center ring of the DIY picture frame with our AS Chalk paint in French Linen to match our center board, following the rest of the frame in an old white color.

DIY Picture Frame by Hello I Live Here

We added a white cloths pin clip purchased from Joann’s Crafts into the center of the board with our glue for our picture to hang in the center, and hung on the wall to share with our family and guests.  We used a cloths pin because we like to change out our photos as they arrive from family.

DIY Picture Frame by Hello I Live Here

This really was an easy project to create your own DIY picture frame.  If you do not have a saw to cut the 45 degree angles, you can use a compound miter box and hand saw, or have a handy neighbor cut the angels for you.   Once done, stand back and enjoy your DIY picture frame handy work!

DIY Picture Frame by Hello I Live Here

We hope you enjoyed our post on making a DIY picture frame today.  We love that you stopped by to read our post.  Stay warm and safe out there if you live in a bad weather area.  If you are in the sun, absorb a little for me – Vitamin D is starting to become a food group here in Missouri and I can use all I can get! 😉

Until tomorrow’s post!

Linda 🙂

How to Install a Trash compactor

How to Install a Trash Compactor

How to Install a Trash Compactor

Hello readers!  Today’s post, Hello I Live Here shows you how to install a trash compactor.  I have waited to get this one appliance back for quite some time.  Because our kitchen is on the smaller side, 10′ x 10′  – yep you read that right – I wanted to make sure I could part with the cabinet space before installing the trash compactor appliance.

How to Install a Trash Compactor

Finding I could not live without it, I took the reins and ordered a Sears Kenmore Trash compactor.  Needless to say, today’s post is all about how to install a trash compactor.  Hubby was surprised when he opened the door to see Sears Home Delivery today :-).  Yep, he quickly moved from working on a table, to help install a trash compactor.  Jumping from one project to another – that’s how we roll over here at Hello I Live Here ;-).  It’s all in the frantic life of Linda!

When we first moved into the Villa, I built a recycling center with the help of plans from the great Ana White that we retro fitted to our own needs to provide basket storage as well.  The best thing, this center worked to keep that unsightly can of trash covered.  Pee U!!! I hate looking at trash.  Now that I find we can live without that space, I decide today was the day.  Calling Sears just yesterday, I plead my case, told them I blog, and bam a trash compactor arrived the next morning (paid for by us of course, but Sears was great to give us free delivery).

Here’s are our steps for how to install a trash compactor:

We started by removing the drawers, doors and face frames from the existing kitchen cabinet.  The left kitchen cabinet opening was going to be replaced with the trash compactor, but the right kitchen cabinet was going to be reused.  So, we took great care not to break the kitchen cabinet face frames.

How to Install a Trash Compactor

Next, we cut out the bottom of the kitchen cabinet and the shelf inside.  We measured 15 ¼ inches inward, the width of the trash compactor, and used our skill saw to make room for the trash compactor.

How to Install a Trash Compactor

Before we went further with our install, we did a dry fit to make sure the trash compactor fit the space we cut – and it did – like a glove!  Since the right kitchen cabinet bottom shelf was unsupported, we added a 1 x 5” pine board to the bottom of the floor area.  We secured the pine board to the shelf using our Ryobi nail gun with 2” brad nails to secure the board to the underside and back of the cabinet for stability to the newly cut shelf.

How to Install a Trash Compactor

The next step in how to install a trash compactor was to add the side panel back to the cabinet.  This would create a kitchen cabinet space separated from the trash compactor. To ensure an exact fit, we cut our kitchen cabinet side panel 35” from floor to under counter.  Then we slid the side panel into place and used a pencil to draw a line atop the bottom cabinet.  This indicated where we wanted to cut our side panel.  Next, we drew a pencil line to mark the top kitchen cabinet shelf.  This pencil mark would define where we would router for the top cabinet shelf to slide into place.  This process provided stability to both the top and lower kitchen cabinet shelf area.  Strong as an ox! 😉 The way it should be.

How to Install a Trash Compactor

Then we had the electrician put in an electrical outlet.  We don’t like doing this part so we went to lunch and let them go at it. When we returned the electrical was complete.  Next we plugged in the trash compactor and slid it into place. The final step was to add the face frames we removed earlier.  We had to do trim the vertical center kitchen cabinet frames, but the horizontal frames fit perfectly.

How to Install a Trash Compactor

The final steps for how to install a trash compactor was to replace the kitchen cabinet door and drawer we originally removed.   compactor.

How to Install a Trash Compactor

That’s all there was to how to install a trash compactor!  Not so bad was it?

How to Install a Trash Compactor

Our next DIY Project is special kitchen storage that we partnered with D. Lawless Hardware – I think you will all be excited about this storage and the surprise of where we are installing this handy storage.  So make sure you stop by and see the post.

D Lawless Hardware

Thanks for stopping by Hello I Live Here – Until tomorrow –

Linda 🙂

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