Posts Tagged ‘Rustoleum’

Updating a Bathroom Vanity

Updating a Bathroom Vanity

Updating a Bathroom Vanity – Part III Master Bath Makeover

Happy Wednesday everyone!  Welcome to part III of our master bathroom update on updating a bathroom vanity.  Yesterday, we shared how we installed our Board and Batten Wainscoting (featured on Bob Vila Nation), and our master bathroom storage we build in the first two parts of the master bathroom makeover.

Today, my post is about the updating a bathroom vanity, that was builder grade, with a splash of color.  I never liked the lighter cabinetry when we purchased our Villa, and I knew I would be updating a bathroom vanity as soon as I could with paint – there is nothing more dull then a vanity you dislike!  So let’s get started on making this dull vanity shine. 🙂

Updating a Bathroom Vanity

Here’s what you will need for updating a bathroom vanity, which can be purchased from Lowe’s and The Home Depot :

Updating a Bathroom Vanity

Here’s the process Hello I Live Here used:

First, we cleaned down the vanity and let dry. Next, we removed the hardware, doors, drawers and false fronts.  Make sure you use painters tape to keep your walls clean if your vanity touches them.)  Then, I used liquid sand and let dry. (Our vanity had a clear finish, using liquid sand before I painted, helped to adhere the primer/paint.)

Updating a Bathroom Vanity

Once dry we applied our primer to both sides of the doors, drawer fronts/false panels, and the frame.  We lightly sanded in between the primer and paint color.  Using a tact cloth we removed the excess sand dust and put added the paint color to the vanity.  Once dry repeat a second coat.  After the drying process (the next day) I added two coats of quick dry polyurethane for protection.

Updating a Bathroom Vanity

Finish the project by reattaching the doors, drawers/false fronts, and adding your new hardware.

Updating a Bathroom Vanity

Your project is now ready for you to enjoy!

Updating a Bathroom Vanity

I love painting pieces, but the most important thing on a bathroom vanity is to take your time and prep the vanity properly to make sure you don’t have to redo the piece.  I hope you enjoyed Part III of our Bathroom makeover series.  I will be back tomorrow to show you what we do to update the vanity top and mirror/lighting in Part IV.

Have a great night everyone!!

Linda

Towel Holder and Dowel Rack

Hello I Live Here - Towel Holder and Dowel Rack

Make a Towel Holder and Dowel Rack combination for more bathroom storage.

Have you run out of places to hang your flannels, towels and other bath-time accessories?  This Towel Holder and Dowel Rack combination will solve your storage problem!  🙂 I made this adorable towel holder from scrap wood left in my wood bin (just like the picture frames I made last week).  Here’s all you need to complete this Towel Holder and Dowel Rack that is sure to give your bathroom a touch of class.

MATERIALS

Crosspieces  (2 pieces @ 11 3/8″ x 7/8″ x 7/8″ – softwood like pine)

Slats (6 pieces @ 22 5/8″ x 7/8″ x 7/8″ – softwood like pine)

Spacer (1 piece @ 24″ x 1 3/5″ x 1/2″ – MDF or plywood)

Rail Back Board (1 piece @ 23 5/8″ x 5 3/4″ x 3/4″ – softwood like pine)

Pegs (4 wooden dowels cut 4 3/4″ long and 1″ diameter – we used 5 dowels 1/2″ in size.  Make sure to adjust your spacing if you use smaller dowels)

Brackets (2 pieces @ 4 3/8″ x 4 3/8″ x 3/4″ – softwood like pine)

Back Bars (2 pieces @ 13″ x 1 3/4″ x 3/4″ – softwood like pine)

TOOLS

– 12 galvanized wood-screws ( 1 3/8″ x 1/8″) – Galvanized screws will not rust.

– Pencil for marking

– Straight edge for aligning

– Square

– Power drill with 1/8 ” straight bit and a 1″ spade bit (Same size as your dowel)

– Power drill/screwdriver

– Mouse Sander with Abrasive paper (start with 80 grit; finish with 120 or 220)

– Wood Glue/wood filler to fill nail holes

– Paint or stain (I used Rustoleum White Oil Base Spray Paint with a high gloss finish)

– Polyurethane varnish (this will not be required if you use the Rustoleum White Oil Base Spray Paint)

Let’s get started on this neat project to build a Towel Holder and Dowel Rack 🙂

1.  Taking your two crosspieces, mark off divisions with the spacer and one of the slats.  Lay one slat atop both crosspieces, flush with the end, and draw a pencil line.  Lay the spacer against the first slate and add the second slat.  Draw a pencil mark line to mark the placement of the second slat.  Continue marking alternate slat and spacer divisions.  Make sure the final slat is flush with the crosspiece end.

Hello I Live Here - Towel Holder and Dowel Rack

 

2.  Now take your square and make an X inside every other slat area starting from the end.  The X marks the center where you will attach the slats to the crosspieces.

3.  Using a 1/8 ” drill bit and your power drill, drill a hole through each slat.

Hello I Live Here - Towel Holder and Dowel Rack

4.  Install the two outer slats first with the suggested screws.  Doing this helps hold the piece straight why you install the remaining slats.  Use the MDF spacer to ensure the equal gaps between the slats.  Make sure your ends are flush by feeling with your fingers.  Continue installing the slats to the crosspieces.

Hello I Live Here -Towel Holder and Dowel Rack

5.  Now for the dowels.  Locate the center of the rail back and draw a pencil line lengthwise.  Use equal space to mark the location of each dowel.  (The first dowels should be about 4 1/2″ in from each end. ) Continue spacing the dowels using the same approximate distance from each other.  Drill a hole at each marked point with a 1″ spade bit (the hole size should be the same as the dowels).  Clamp the rail back atop some scrap wood to prevent drill tear out.

Hello I Live Here - Towel Holder and Dowel Rack

6.  Glue each dowel into the drilled holes and let dry.

Hello I Live Here - Towel Holder and Dowel Rack

7.  Cut two brackets to size and place one against each rail back bar, flush with the top and aligned against opposite sides.  We used our Ryobi airstrike nail gun and wood glue to set the brackets, nailing the bottom corners and nailing in from the back and top of the boards.

Hello I Live Here - Towel Holder and Dowel Rack

8.  Next attached the rail back board.  We used Titebond wood glue and our Ryobi nail gun with 1 3/8″ nails to attach as in the photo below.  Make sure your dowels are dry or you could bend them while installing the backboard.

Hello I Live Here - Attaching back board

9.  Next position the shelf on the brackets, with the top of each bracket flush with the inside of the crosspieces.  We again used our Ryobi nailer and wood glue for strength with 1 3/8 ” nails.

Hello I Live Here - Positioning Bracket

10.  Wood fill any open holes, sand, paint, let dry and hang in your bathroom on the wall of your choice.Hello I Live Here - Towel Holder and Dowel Rack

Our Towel Holder and Dowel Rack project took us about 3 hours total including paint.  We hope you find this project as fun as we did.  There is no better feeling then using scrap wood for these great storage pieces.

Hello I Live Here - Towel Holder and Dowel Rack

Don’t forget to share our post on your Pinterest, Facebook, and Hometalk boards so others can enjoy the plans.  Happy wood working!!!

Linda 🙂

Old China Hutch Becomes New Again – Part 1

Annie Sloan Paint applied

Never leave an old piece behind – especially if it’s a China Cabinet!

Good afternoon Hello I Live Here readers.  Let’s talk old china hutches today.  Would you pass up a chance to transform an old china hutch?  The other day I was in a thrift store (Red Racks Thrift Store –  DAV Thrift Store) and came across an old china hutch.

Top of China Hutch
Top of China Hutch

 

Bottom of China Hutch
Bottom of China Hutch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As others were walking past her with a sour expression, Hello I Lived Here saw the potential and swooped in to purchase this little gem for $40 (that’s right both pieces).

Living in a smaller home, space is necessary, so for us at Hello I Live Here this older jewel was the right size and would allow us to display our unopened dishes still stored. Below is a picture of the 1970’s jewel Hello I Live Here found and started transforming.  Here’s how we updated the old china hutch.

We started by taking off the old trim.  Don’t worry, we will save this for our recycle pile for another project! :-).

Old Trim on floor
Old Trim on floor

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hubby was not so sure, but he humored me anyway and started the destruction.  The screws were hard to get to with our regular drill, so Curt removed the trim and piece needing to be cut with the Ryobi 18V Right Angle Drill which was terrific to fit in tight spaces.

P241_1_Final

Trim Removed
Trim Removed

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once the old trim was removed, we scribed a line and cut off the rounded edge you see at the top in the photo with a craftsman circular saw, giving the china hutch a new square appearance.

Cut Made with Craftsman Circular Saw
Cut Made with Craftsman Circular Saw

 

Old Trim on floor - Craftsman Saw
Old Trim on floor – Craftsman Saw

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once the cut was complete, we screwed the cut piece back to the china hutch top.  Now the square, craftsman style we love over here at Hello I Live Here, helped to shape rest of the design for the china hutch.

Cut Piece Returned to China Hutch
Cut Piece Returned to China Hutch

 

 

 

 

 

 

Using our Ryobi 18V ONE+ 18GA CORDLESS 2″ BRAD NAILER, we trimmed out the sides with 1×2 into a craftsman type feel purchased from our favorite store, The Home Depot.

Ryobi-Nailer
Ryobi-Nailer
Sides Trimmed with 1x2
Sides Trimmed with 1×2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once set, we added 1/4 round moldings American Wood Moulding WM108 1/2 in. x 1/2 in. x 96 in. Wood Pine Quarter Round Moulding to finish the look.

1/4 Round used at bottom
1/4 Round used at bottom

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Making sure the 1×2 did not stand over the bottom frame, I took the 1/4 round molding and turned it into the opening and nailed upside down. This provided a square edge for the 1×2 to sit without overhang.

Moving on to the top, we trimmed out the top using a 1 x 4 x 8 Select White Pine Board and Focal Point DWT3144-16 1-1/8 in. 3-1/2 in. x 192 in. Primed Polyurethane Window/Door trim.

Trimmed with Select Pine
Trimmed with Select Pine

 

Front 1x3 installed
Front 1×3 installed

 

 

 

 

 

 

To finish the look we added a small matching WM 984 3/8 in. x 1-3/8 in. Pine Mullion Moulding to the bottom of the 1×4 and then added the original trim piece back over top of the doors (I try to use the old pieces in a new way).  We love using the Ryobi brad nailer.  Its airstrike technology truly helps wood from splitting by to large of force.   Below is what it looks like trimmed out – Not bad for an old 1970’s piece!

Old trim piece above doors
Old trim piece above door
Trimmed piece
Trimmed piece

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After Hello I Live Here changed up the 1970’s China Cabinet, we primed the piece with a grey Rust-Oleum ultra cover latex primer.

primer
primer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Because the piece was older, a primer was necessary to provide a tight bond for the top coat, and provide a long lasting finish.  So what better choice than the trusted quality of Rust-Oleum 🙂

Primer on china cabinet
Primer on china cabinet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once dry, we applied a thin coat of Annie Sloan Chalk Paint in Old Ochre purchased from our friends at Wood Icing in the Chesterfield Mall.

Annie Sloan Paint applied
Annie Sloan Paint applied

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This unique decorative paint provided the piece the quality look we at Hello I Live Here are used to seeing.  We will be following the Old Ochre color up with a light coat of Annie Sloan brown wax once we complete Part II of our post.  This will give the china hutch a consistent antique look for this old piece that is new again.

woodicing Chalk Paint Annie Sloan
woodicing Chalk Paint Annie Sloan
Annie Sloan paint
Annie Sloan paint

 

 

sloan wax kit
sloan wax kit

 

 

 

 

 

 

It is our suggestion that you use the Annie Sloan brush with the paint and wax (purchased at Wood Icing).

sloan small brush
sloan small brush

I know they are pricey, but my last piece I used a regular bush, but noticed I used more paint, lesson learned!  This wonderful brush allowed me to buff the piece just right the first time, conserving both the paint and the wax.  Well, that’s part I of the China Hutch make over.  Hope you enjoyed the first half of Hello I Live Here’s China Hutch make over. Join at our site in a couple days for Part II and the full reveal of the China Hutch!

Happy start to October Y’all!

-Linda C

DIY Shutter Towel Rack

DIY Towel Racks

DIY Shutter Towel Rack

In our upstairs bathroom, which is primarily used as a guest bathroom or when my other daughter comes home for a weekend visit, I needed to come up with a functional yet decorative way to keep bath towels in the bathroom because the space doesn’t have a lot of storage.  I decided I would make a piece that could be displayed as a wall hanging, but it would also double as a towel rack for my daughter or our guests.  After a few hours of thinking up designs, I had it..I would make a DIY Shutter towel rack!

Here are the items you will need to make this functional DIY Shutter Towel Rack wall hanging for your bathroom:

–          House Shutters

–          Spray paint

–          8 big gardening hooks

–          Screw driver

–          Screws

–          Drill

–          2 pieces of 1X2

–          Nuts and bolts

–          Level

Want to make it?  Here are the steps:

1.   Spray paint the shutters (I found two old plastic ones at a garage sale) before you do anything, this will get all of the surfaces covered so there is no white showing through on your finished product.  I used Rust-Oleum® Universal Paint and Primer in One in a Hammered Brown.  I find that you may pay a little more for it, but it has a texture to it and it also sticks to any surface.

DIY Shutter Towel Rack DIY Shutter Towel Rack DIY Shutter Towel Rack - Painted

2.   Take the two painted shutters after they are dry and flip them over so the front is laying on your work surface.  Clip the two shutters with a clamp and the 1X2 and drill four holes in the wood and shutters and fasten them together with the nuts and bolts.

Connecting the two shutters
Connecting the two shutters

3.   After the shutters are secured together flip them over so you can start putting on the hooks.  On the thick molding of the shutters place one hook on each side then, on the other shutter stagger where you put the other hooks so they aren’t right next to the hooks you just drilled in.  Keep doing this until you have four sets of hooks with two hooks on each molding.  Drill in the hooks after you have the hooks evenly spaced from one another.

Attach plant hangers to the shutters
Attach plant hangers to the shutters

4.   Take the finished DIY Shutter Towel Rack into the bathroom you are going to hang it in and measure where you want to drill holes to hang the piece.  After measuring and making sure the piece will be level, drill the holes into the wall and place screws or hooks into the holes so the piece can be hung.

DIY Shutter Towel Rack
DIY Shutter Towel Rack

5.   Place your rolled up towels into the hooks and enjoy your functional but decorative new DIY Shutter Towel Rack !

DIY Shutter Towel Rack
DIY Shutter Towel Rack

Enjoy your DIY Shutter Towel Rack – Have a great Friday and happy crafting!

-LC